Lies of Omission

Sunday, April 20, 2014

Patriot Information Network, or Something

I have been looking into Patriot comms. I have gotten some good advice and cautions along the way. The crux of every effective bit of communication is that it come from a reliable source. After that, it all gets complicated and difficult to manage. Like everything else, power enters into it at some point and skews the dynamic, making reliable sources into not so reliable sources. A single point of contact gives the opposition a place to focus.

After reading some very reliable accounts of the Bundy Ranch events it is clear that communication was an issue. Rumors swirled in the electronic air of the Internet. Getting any reliable information out of the Bundy Ranch was difficult due to the fact that those engaged in the action had little time and/or ability to reach out to the greater community and provide truth with details.

The surprising and pleasing fact is that thousands of patriots were willing to mobilize against the threat posed by the federal government. That they didn't know where to go, or who to believe kept a lot of reinforcements on the sidelines. As this struggle against a corrupt and dangerously impudent gang in Washington that call itself "government" it will be even more important to dispatch quality intel and get appropriate responses.

Information is faced with a multitude of challenges in this atmosphere. There are political opponents which showed themselves clearly when the Bundy Ranch started trending strongly on social media sites. It is not above them to cause mischief by rumormongering. There are government employees with a reason to inject misinformation and disinformation to confuse the messages. There are big and small media names interested in self-promotion by producing "exclusives" which might validate their own agendas, but do little for providing those forces in reserve good, actionable intelligence.

So, what to do?

The model I am looking at would rely on HAM radio operators on the scene communicating with operators outside the immediate area (preferably militia communication officers) then distributing that information to large patriot blogsites like WRSA, III Percent Patriots and Sipsey Street Irregulars. Much larger than that and agendas get worked into the mix and intel not directly connected to the media name is diminished or discarded.

The method of verification would be consensus of the relayed message. For instance, any single bit of information might be manipulated further down the stream, but the sheer volume of reports would indicate consistency and largely accuracy. The key is to obtain that information from known sources, which would put a direct link between militia communication officers and these sites.

And, this is where things usually fall apart. It would take cooperation and volunteerism. Those in the militia communication group would have to team up with bloggers and establish those trusted lines of communication. Next, it would be necessary to have someone in the militia communication group  present on the scene, or be relayed information directly from their commander on the scene.

So, here is the pitch. I would request that bloggers reach out to local militia units and see if these connections can be made and to strengthen these arrangements with personal contact. Once this contact is made, the blog will be put on a list of those to be visited if some action is taking place. This link list should be kept by every participating blogger. Then, those interested in getting reliable information could click on as many of the links as possible to get all the different reports until the truth emerges from the volume of posts. This would not be for aggregating internet rumors. The idea is to draw directly from the ground.

The other half of the equation is for militia information officers make contact with each other (which I hope they already have to some degree) exchange information frequencies and agree to participate in the information network.

I hate to name this network until all the bugs are worked out. Let me know if there is a simpler, more secure method of information dissemination. I might be thinking way too complicated, which is my nature, when there are more streamlined avenues available.

The only truth here is that we need a better system if we are going to be effective and be able to respond not only at the site, but around the nation in support of whatever local crisis is at hand.

21 comments:

  1. Plenty of people are working on that, I'm sure. I know first-hand that at least one is.

    I think truth by evidence beats truth by consensus every time, though sometimes there's only consensus on which to go. Personally I think the focus should be more on verification of the evidence than trying to vet the source...mainly cuz that latter is a chore that never ends. Nothing persuades like a real-time clip, and those shouldn't be that tough to verify.

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    1. By concensus I meant that where communication can be manipulated, derailed and open to disinformation, it is possible to overcome that with the sheer volume of the right information overwhelming the attempts to spread disinformation. It takes a lot, but there is no shortage of patriot bloggers. If enough people get the same message, that is most likely (not absolute) to be the legitimate message.

      I am not a lone ranger on this thing. I have been in touch with Sparks and defer to his expertise.

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  2. I'm a ham operator. Part of the problem is that in many situations only handheld radios are practical, and those have limited bandwidth and limited range. If a repeater station is nearby the range is increased somewhat, but there's always the chance that the govt. will force area repeaters to shut down. The bandwidth issue is more of a problem, really -- handheld radios usually only offer the two-meter band and the seventy-centimeter band, and occasionally also the one and a quarter-meter band. These aren't long-waveform bands that travel beyond the earth's curvature -- really ten-meter and longer bands would be better, as messages could be sent hundreds of miles without need of a repeater, and could be received by a wider swathe of patriot operators. But most of the long-waveform band transmitters/receivers are large base station units, and aren't practical for carrying around during operations.

    Now, if there's someone local, say, camped a few miles up the road or in a nearby motel with a long-band transmitter/receiver, that operator could receive reports from the field from operators with smaller handheld units, and could in turn broadcast the information in those reports to a much wider audience. And there are some portable units that can operate in the longer waveform reaches, but those are pricier than a lot of operators can handle.

    That having been said, more and more patriots are getting their ham licenses, so at least area by area we'll be able to keep in touch, assuming we've got ways to keep the batteries charged. And there are decent inexpensive little solar panel sets that will charge a phone or radio fairly quickly.

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    1. A BETTER option is an Iridium Satellite Phone:
      .
      1)They are expensive, but not when compared to the cost of a singleupper-end AR with good glass.
      2) Airtime is expensive too, approx $1.50/min plus or minus
      3) They are size of early cell phones, but 1/6 weight of old brick phones,
      can be had rainproof and ruggedized (Iridium 9575)
      4) Spare batteries weigh mere oz's, so if you carry phone in a pocket or pouch and several batteries, you will have more than a WEEK of optime.
      5) Super Reliable voice coms
      6) emails can be sent/received with a plug-in device about the size of a deck of cards
      (Iridium Axcess Point) and sent with your own iPhone or Android

      My two cents as a First Responder/Trainer/Licensed HAM
      Good Luck & God Bless
      VF-154

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    2. Not a bad idea, will keep that in mind.

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  3. Just to make it explicit, the key concept for all of this, is one word---redundancy. Or even a simpler word, backup.

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  4. Just a question from someone who knows nothing about any of this, but does anyone have the ability to set up a mobile satellite uplink, i.e. a HughesNet-type of broadband connection? It's at least an alternate connection, and I don't know how hard/easy it would be to shut down.

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    Replies
    1. Anything can be shut down, but the presumption has to be that not everything will be shut down. The old FIDONET paradigm was a regularly scheduled distribution to all nodes, up and down...across would be necessary now too. Back then it was daily, but it could be anything these days, even every minute. But of course, without solid redundancy, that's no answer. Still, it would probably work in most modes.

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  5. This is a bad idea. Ham operations for politico is an abuse of the resource and radio service. Use the internet. Get secure there, don't burn individual radio operators. Use Ham radio when there's a real emergency.

    Ham is not secure, not spoof resistant, not anonymous, jammable, licensed, expensive and human intensive. You can fix all of that with sensible use of the internet. And not put radio operators on the front line of your war.

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  6. I disagree - hams have passed safety and welfare traffic for decades. We practice constantly and are expert at long-distance portable operations.

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  7. Hey, don't you guys know the #1 ethical principle of the 20th Century? It was at the end of Trading Places, when the knockout bikini-clad lady was asked whether they should have cracked crab or lobster for lunch.

    "Can't we have both?"

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  8. Why couldn't someone with a 10m HAM radio and general license be on site? Who cares if it's heavy, put it on a golf club caddy, or in bicycle panniers or on a horse or something. Have that be their one job, and have another guy be their bodyguard and/or radio buddy. Preferably someone else with a general license so they can both transmit without the other being present, for if someone gets sick/heat exhaustion/arrested/has to pee etc.

    Also, have more than one station ready in case one is confiscated, malfunctions or is destroyed. You can put up multiple repeaters for different groups of people with the handhelds, and with a scanner one could listen to all the transmissions at once and then digitize them for broadcast on the internet, or different people could be monitoring different frequencies and making decisions.

    Or set up your own private cell towers. This site appears to be obsolete so I found it in Wayback: the Serval Project https://web.archive.org/web/20110930173905/http://www.servalproject.org/

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    1. 10 meter radios are just ah little heaver than a CB radio. Use mobile units that go in cars. They make for great backpack/mountaintop communications. Also TenTech puts out a hand size transceiver for voice and CW. Problem is with all this power is still needed and batteries are heavy.

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  9. There is an app for Android/iPhone/PC called "Zello", it is a push-to-talk app that works VERY well. It has been used successfully by people organizing at the grassroots level in Venezuela and Ukraine.

    Users can contact each other (after approving a request) or you can talk in "groups" (called "channels"). There is currently a Zello channel called, "Cliven Bundy Communications" that would be an EXCELLENT source of real-time communications for those on site and elsewhere.

    Seriously, it's good stuff.

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  10. T.L, good idea. I am not a radio guy,not even tech savvy really. But if we float the idea around Dio,Snake Ind, and others who are will come up with a solution. Plus a back up and a back up plan for the back up.Since almost anything can be jammed or blocked,seems to me several options would be good. I will the post. Been down a long time but I got 3 people who still read me,they can pass it on.
    China
    III

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  11. See i can't even type! I will Link to the post!
    China
    III

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  12. Almost every Militia outfit I know has a HAM set up of one kind or another, even if only UV5R 2 meters. All have GMRS and CB too. Most prepper/survivalist group have the same capability. HAM relay will work, but only to get the info out of the immediate AO, then it would be up to our web-jockeys to publish and disseminate. None of us carry cells when operational, for many reasons.

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    1. Understandable, we need to purchase these radios and start working on it. Sooner the better.

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  13. get a mil. rat rig. Listen to LIBERTY TREE RADIO.

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  14. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heliograph
    What is old is new again. Not a cure all, but a tool to supplement the very good lines of thought being discussed. I wonder how that would work with IR...

    ReplyDelete

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